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Black bears reportedly moving into Oklahoma
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Raptor



Joined: 30 Jun 2008
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PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2010 9:08 pm    Post subject: Black bears reportedly moving into Oklahoma Reply with quote

A bear roams where it wants to roam. That's just a rule of nature.

Black bears are a natural, and likely expanding, part of Oklahoma, so residents of northeastern Oklahoma might as well get used to the idea of seeing them — even in their backyards.

If increased reports such as one that had a bear relocated from Claremore on Wednesday and two others eyed in the Broken Arrow area are a reliable indication, black bear numbers are growing and spreading north and west from more concentrated populations in the heavily forested southeastern part of the state.

Wildlife officials have no hard data, however.

Even the well-documented populations in Pushmataha, McCurtain and LeFlore counties, where the state had its first black bear hunting season last year, seem to be more robust than expected, given results of the hunt in which 19 were killed.

"None of the bears killed were research bears or tagged bears, so that tells me the population is probably quite a bit larger than we estimated," said Joe Hemphill, a supervisor in the state Department of Wildlife Conservation's southeast region.

The department based its harvest quota of 20 on a conservative estimate of 200 bears in that three-county area. At least 100 bears in that area wear tags.

"In my opinion, with the increased reports and the nuisance activity, the black bear population is probably larger than our estimates, and it's no doubt ranging out there and getting into some other counties," Hemphill said.

Daniel
Griffith, a spokesman at the department's office in Jenks, said, "In the Tulsa area, it's kind of rare to see them." He added, however, that black bears have been seen in the area and that is is generally recognized among area biologists that the bears are expanding across the state.

Hemphill said the department was working with Oklahoma State University to begin a study of bears in northeastern Oklahoma. The goal is to catch bears and fit them with signal collars that allow biologists to track their movements.

"What we'll be looking for is the stability of the female, where she's going and where she's having babies," Hemphill said.

He would also like to collar a young male or two if possible, as the males do most of the wandering. Young males stay with the sow for 16 to 18 months but are then either chased off by the sow or the boar — or are killed by the boar.

Sightings of black bears often increase in June and July as these youngsters roam, looking for easy meals and trying to find a new place in the world.

"I'd like to see exactly how far west they will go, or if they go back into Arkansas, back and forth across the line. It will be interesting to see what they do in that part of the world," Hemphill said.

Roaming black bears generally are not a threat to humans or livestock, although lessons from bear-dense parts of the world show that they can be dangerous. Hemphill said he knew of no reported attacks by bears against humans in Oklahoma and that only two nuisance bears have killed livestock — pigs in both instances.

People who have trouble with bears are generally advised to keep any sources of food sealed and put away, Hemphill said. Dog food, corn and unattended garbage have proved to be the biggest attractors. "We tell people to make sure their dog food is put away and in a tightly sealed container. If it's open even a crack, a bear will break into it," he said.

The department welcomes reports of sightings, he said.

Department officials try to avoid relocating a bear, he said. If whatever is attracting the bear can be removed or otherwise made unavailable, the best thing to do then is to watch from a safe location, leave the bear alone and let it eventually roam along.
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This is mildly worrying as far as I'm concerned. As if I don't have enough predators to protect my goats from Neutral
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Sino



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PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2010 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hope they don't harm your goats.
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Raptor



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PostPosted: Fri May 21, 2010 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not really in the area where they're at, but they're starting to migrate
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Døøm Dragøn



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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 2:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh dear. Them bears are gonna get in my trash! Well we don't have much bears were I live. It would be easier if the bears could be carted off to places that need bears.
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Rockarmy4866



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PostPosted: Tue May 25, 2010 12:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

well if they do eat your goats well... its nature.
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Raptor



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PostPosted: Tue May 25, 2010 1:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rockarmy4866 wrote:
well if they do eat your goats well... its nature.


So you wouldn't be angry if a bear ate your dog? I have goats that are worth between $600 and $1,000. I also have a buck that due to his rare genetics is worth several thousand dollars.

You know what happens when people say "oh well" to raptor's goats getting killed?

MATH TIME!

I have roughly 140 goats, give or take five or six. Since I have different breeds and different purity levels, let's put each goat at being worth $200 for simplicities sake. So..

140 x 200 = $28,000 worth of livestock.

That's a rough estimate considering the commercial males are worth about $50 each, still, it adds up. The worth isn't taking into consideration the money put into the animals. Money such as: food, medication, vet visits. If I wanted to add even more money, I could add in the cost of fencing, goat equipment (milking equipment, milking/hoof trimming stand, castration/ear tagging tools), goat education courses..

If you have that much money wrapped up in animals, you wouldn't twiddle your thumbs when it comes to keeping them safe and alive. For the record, I've already lost about $600 in goats this year.

x) I would like to add that it's also nature for dogs to want to eat the neighbor's cat..But if your dog eats the neighbors cat..That tends to result in an irate neighbor..
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Starley



Joined: 15 May 2010
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PostPosted: Tue May 25, 2010 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Raptor wrote:
Rockarmy4866 wrote:
well if they do eat your goats well... its nature.


So you wouldn't be angry if a bear ate your dog? I have goats that are worth between $600 and $1,000. I also have a buck that due to his rare genetics is worth several thousand dollars.

You know what happens when people say "oh well" to raptor's goats getting killed?

MATH TIME!

I have roughly 140 goats, give or take five or six. Since I have different breeds and different purity levels, let's put each goat at being worth $200 for simplicities sake. So..

140 x 200 = $28,000 worth of livestock.

That's a rough estimate considering the commercial males are worth about $50 each, still, it adds up. The worth isn't taking into consideration the money put into the animals. Money such as: food, medication, vet visits. If I wanted to add even more money, I could add in the cost of fencing, goat equipment (milking equipment, milking/hoof trimming stand, castration/ear tagging tools), goat education courses..

If you have that much money wrapped up in animals, you wouldn't twiddle your thumbs when it comes to keeping them safe and alive. For the record, I've already lost about $600 in goats this year.

x) I would like to add that it's also nature for dogs to want to eat the neighbor's cat..But if your dog eats the neighbors cat..That tends to result in an irate neighbor..

i still like bears i like all animals ^^ why would you pay that much for goats i wouldn`t o.o you cant blame every thing on the bear its people fault bears are moving
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Raptor



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PostPosted: Tue May 25, 2010 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1. The goats are registered. Registered stock of any species is going to be more expensive. An unregistered, grade goat won't sell for more than $50. Maybe more if it's sent to auction and is a youngster.
2. The goats are a rare breed.

Sure, you might think it's pointless, but you'd be singing a different tune if you were in my shoes. People who are sympathetic towards predators don't last long as ranchers.
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Starley



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PostPosted: Tue May 25, 2010 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Raptor wrote:
1. The goats are registered. Registered stock of any species is going to be more expensive. An unregistered, grade goat won't sell for more than $50. Maybe more if it's sent to auction and is a youngster.
2. The goats are a rare breed.

Sure, you might think it's pointless, but you'd be singing a different tune if you were in my shoes. People who are sympathetic towards predators don't last long as ranchers.

still not buying theres more to life then buying rare goats for like $1,000
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Hailey



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PostPosted: Tue May 25, 2010 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In your oppion-wise. Raptor sells and breeds goats to make a profit I believe; and goats are used for a lot of things, meat, dairy, clothing, etc.
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Kenya



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PostPosted: Wed May 26, 2010 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Everyone has their own thoughts surrounding bears. If I were in Raptor's shoes, I would dislike them as well if they came near the goats. I know what it's like to have raised livestock (I use to help out a bit on my uncle's farm raising horses and cattle).
But, in starley1431's point of view, bears are creatures too, and they need to eat.
Also, starley1431, raising goats, for some people, is a way of life. It's like a job. If you had a job, let's say...owning a bank, then would you be happy if one day a robber came in and took all the money? It's like that, but with goats. (Bears being the robbers and goats being the money. ^ ^)
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Raptor



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PostPosted: Wed May 26, 2010 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

starley1431 wrote:
Raptor wrote:
1. The goats are registered. Registered stock of any species is going to be more expensive. An unregistered, grade goat won't sell for more than $50. Maybe more if it's sent to auction and is a youngster.
2. The goats are a rare breed.

Sure, you might think it's pointless, but you'd be singing a different tune if you were in my shoes. People who are sympathetic towards predators don't last long as ranchers.

still not buying theres more to life then buying rare goats for like $1,000


Clearly you've never been involved in any form of business. You realize that people will spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on race horses, right? I believe that the highest selling racehorse sold for 1.2 million. Even pedigreed dogs and cats will sell for $1,000.
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Starley



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PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2010 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i see what you mean....if i were in raptor shoes i wll be mad but i wont hate the bear and bear are not the only ones that can harm the goats animals like wolves,coyotes and even diesese can harm the goats.....you should get guard dogs to protect the goats or a eletric fence.i have never seen a wild bear and where i live there isnt really any wild bear but there wild deer.i dont want to live in oklahoma it has to many tornados.
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Raptor



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PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2010 5:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

starley1431 wrote:
i see what you mean....if i were in raptor shoes i wll be mad but i wont hate the bear and bear are not the only ones that can harm the goats animals like wolves,coyotes and even diesese can harm the goats.....you should get guard dogs to protect the goats or a eletric fence.i have never seen a wild bear and where i live there isnt really any wild bear but there wild deer.i dont want to live in oklahoma it has to many tornados.


That's why the ranch has investing in several .22s. I also already have dogs. They kill and eat the coyotes. Shame. I really wouldn't mind hunting a few. Additionally..Electric fences take way, way too much maintenance. I easily have over two miles of fencing that I have the maintain. Electric fences will short out if, for example, a tree branch touches them. Easier just to use standard fencing.
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Rockarmy4866



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PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2010 9:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Raptor wrote:
Rockarmy4866 wrote:
well if they do eat your goats well... its nature.


So you wouldn't be angry if a bear ate your dog? I have goats that are worth between $600 and $1,000. I also have a buck that due to his rare genetics is worth several thousand dollars.

You know what happens when people say "oh well" to raptor's goats getting killed?

MATH TIME!

I have roughly 140 goats, give or take five or six. Since I have different breeds and different purity levels, let's put each goat at being worth $200 for simplicities sake. So..

140 x 200 = $28,000 worth of livestock.

That's a rough estimate considering the commercial males are worth about $50 each, still, it adds up. The worth isn't taking into consideration the money put into the animals. Money such as: food, medication, vet visits. If I wanted to add even more money, I could add in the cost of fencing, goat equipment (milking equipment, milking/hoof trimming stand, castration/ear tagging tools), goat education courses..

If you have that much money wrapped up in animals, you wouldn't twiddle your thumbs when it comes to keeping them safe and alive. For the record, I've already lost about $600 in goats this year.

x) I would like to add that it's also nature for dogs to want to eat the neighbor's cat..But if your dog eats the neighbors cat..That tends to result in an irate neighbor..


i dont support people using animals to make money. why dont you have kids and sell them for money.
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