Web Earth Online Forum Index Web Earth Online
User discussion and support forum for Web Earth Online, Home Page
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile Log inLog in 

How Chimpanzees Mourn Their Dead
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Web Earth Online Forum Index -> Critter Cam and Animal News
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
webearthonline



Joined: 03 Feb 2007
Posts: 1589

PostPosted: Sun May 02, 2010 5:56 pm    Post subject: How Chimpanzees Mourn Their Dead Reply with quote

In the news ...

"Chimpanzees are our closest primate relative, and have a number of behaviors we once thought were human only: they empathize, cooperate, and have a sense of self. But how do they deal with the most distressing event possible — death?

Two studies this being published in Current Biology this week show a remarkable amount about how chimpanzees mourn, and the effect that death has on them — sometimes in ways very similar to us, sometimes shockingly different.

In what is an incredibly rare occurrence, cameras recorded the death and mourning of two groups of chimps — one with an elderly female, and the other with the death of two infants. When an adult chimp dies unexpectedly or traumatically, the tribe's reaction is often loud and violent. Both times here, the reaction from those close to the dead was very different.

At a UK safari park, three chimps gathered around another, elder female of the group as she neared death. Pansy was more than 50 years old, and had been slowing down for some time. For days before her death, the group was very quiet, and paid her lots of attention. Just before she died, the group continually groomed and caressed her, which researchers think was partly to test for signs of life. When she died, the group left, but her adult daughter came back, and spent the night with the body.

The next day the keepers removed the corpse, and the other chimps remained subdued. For a number of days they avoided sleeping on the platform where she died — usually a prized location, and remained generally quiet for long period afterwards.

At the opposite end of the age spectrum, a group of researchers were studying chimpanzees in Guinea, and observed the death of two infants from flu-like respiratory infections. The mothers responded by carrying around the bodies of their children for weeks or months, to the point where the corpse was mummified. They would take them everywhere, groom them, and take them to sleep. Slowly, over the course of this period, the mothers would begin to let the other chimps come in contact with the dead babies for longer and longer periods. They would increase the length of time they could handle being separate from the bodies, even allowing other young chimpanzees to play with them (like in the video below). They appeared to slowly and gradually accept the passing of their younh.

Our furry cousins obviously have an inkling of death, grief, and empathy, and understanding their view on mortality raises interesting questions about our own. How different is a mother chimpanzee's veneration for their dead child different from Victorian trend of post-mortem photography? How far is it from burying the dead? The chimpanzees seem to have no distaste or repulsion to the dead, even keeping them around for months. Why don't they have any aversion to the potentially disease causing bodies? Is there a chimpanzee afterlife they believe in?

James Anderson of the University of Stirling says of the safari park chimps:

"Several phenomena have at one time or another been considered as setting humans apart from other species: reasoning ability, language ability, tool use, cultural variation, and self-awareness, for example, but science has provided strong evidence that the boundaries between us and other species are nowhere near to being as clearly defined as many people used to think. The awareness of death is another such psychological phenomenon. The findings we've described, along with other observations of how chimpanzees respond to dead and dying companions, indicate that their awareness of death is probably more highly developed than is often suggested. It may be related to their sense of self-awareness, shown through phenomena such as self-recognition and empathy towards others." "

_________________
weo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Rockarmy4866



Joined: 09 Aug 2007
Posts: 364
Location: Mass US

PostPosted: Sun May 02, 2010 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thats amazing weo. I'm actually going to look into it. i find it fascinating
_________________
Danger Aaron
[The First Sheriff]

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Døøm Dragøn



Joined: 20 Jul 2009
Posts: 8500
Location: In world of complete utter choas, oh, how grand!

PostPosted: Sun May 02, 2010 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's so sad. Just goes to show that sometimes animals act better then us with all our petty wars.
_________________
My Minion Army!
<---Click?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Raptor



Joined: 30 Jun 2008
Posts: 672

PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2010 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DøømDråg¤n wrote:
That's so sad. Just goes to show that sometimes animals act better then us with all our petty wars.


I find that amusing since chimps are just as violent, sometimes more, as us with their turf wars. They aren't above killing the offspring of enemy groups.
_________________
Atheism: The Only Non-Prophet Organization
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Vargen Saphia



Joined: 31 Jan 2009
Posts: 2567
Location: Sweden

PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2010 11:02 am    Post subject: Re: How Chimpanzees Mourn Their Dead Reply with quote

webearthonline wrote:
In the news ...

"Chimpanzees are our closest primate relative, and have a number of behaviors we once thought were human only: they empathize, cooperate, and have a sense of self."


Empathize? Chimpanzees? Often?

What I know chimpanzees are often very brutal and violent against others. A bit like a bad gang of teenagers with ADHD and low temper ( I know two persons with ADHD and they have very bad temper) that fights when they get angry.
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
webearthonline



Joined: 03 Feb 2007
Posts: 1589

PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2010 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The most amazing thing is how much animals are like us and how much we are like them. Chimpanzees are one of our closest cousins in the animal world. Consensus thinking doesn't acknowledge this sort of behavior seen here, though it is real
_________________
weo
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Kenya



Joined: 18 Mar 2010
Posts: 2168
Location: In the act of locating my current position

PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2010 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for letting us know WEO, its a very interesting topic.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Døøm Dragøn



Joined: 20 Jul 2009
Posts: 8500
Location: In world of complete utter choas, oh, how grand!

PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2010 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Raptor wrote:
DøømDråg¤n wrote:
That's so sad. Just goes to show that sometimes animals act better then us with all our petty wars.


I find that amusing since chimps are just as violent, sometimes more, as us with their turf wars. They aren't above killing the offspring of enemy groups.


Just like humans though not the babies part today I hope. It's always about being the alpha in the end and $. Have you seen lumars too? Their so dang little gang member pests. Least the girls control everything...yeah chimps 6 and younger are cute but once they hit 7 years their hell on Earth.
_________________
My Minion Army!
<---Click?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Alrai



Joined: 26 Apr 2010
Posts: 898

PostPosted: Tue May 04, 2010 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thought such close relatives to humans would act in such a way. Satisfying to have some proof, though. Thanks.
_________________
...with cookies.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Raptor



Joined: 30 Jun 2008
Posts: 672

PostPosted: Wed May 05, 2010 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

But really, all animals are nasty. Male lions quite happily participate in infanticide. Birds will peck each other to dead..etc.
_________________
Atheism: The Only Non-Prophet Organization
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
fireruby11



Joined: 04 May 2010
Posts: 41
Location: Stareing at the picture compatision hopeing ill get a week of the advanced.

PostPosted: Wed May 05, 2010 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Although who would of thought, chimps are strongly impacted this much by a death! I thought all animals just ate the corsp from insticts, but this is just, truley amazeing.
_________________
Rawr~! Vote For me and my Aligator! (Crocadile?) On the picture contest! Entrey number.. 5!
--
>XD do it and i shall give you.... A COOKIE! AND SOME FRENCH TOAST? oh god... YESH
--
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Døøm Dragøn



Joined: 20 Jul 2009
Posts: 8500
Location: In world of complete utter choas, oh, how grand!

PostPosted: Thu May 06, 2010 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's no just chimps! Today, I had a science project and I have some crickets on display. My grandma did something stupid and poured two glasses of water into the cage to water the plants well I was freaking out she was gonna kill them. Well one cricket ended up dying and a few more lost a leg...and the few lucky crickets came and would not leave the dead cricket...the handy capped ones just hid in a corner though.
_________________
My Minion Army!
<---Click?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Raptor



Joined: 30 Jun 2008
Posts: 672

PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2010 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DøømDråg¤n wrote:
It's no just chimps! Today, I had a science project and I have some crickets on display. My grandma did something stupid and poured two glasses of water into the cage to water the plants well I was freaking out she was gonna kill them. Well one cricket ended up dying and a few more lost a leg...and the few lucky crickets came and would not leave the dead cricket...the handy capped ones just hid in a corner though.


Hate to break it to you, but they were probably eating it. Insects don't have a very advanced nervous system. As it stands, they can't even feel pain, let alone have complex emotions and thoughts.
_________________
Atheism: The Only Non-Prophet Organization
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Døøm Dragøn



Joined: 20 Jul 2009
Posts: 8500
Location: In world of complete utter choas, oh, how grand!

PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2010 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Raptor wrote:
DøømDråg¤n wrote:
It's no just chimps! Today, I had a science project and I have some crickets on display. My grandma did something stupid and poured two glasses of water into the cage to water the plants well I was freaking out she was gonna kill them. Well one cricket ended up dying and a few more lost a leg...and the few lucky crickets came and would not leave the dead cricket...the handy capped ones just hid in a corner though.


Hate to break it to you, but they were probably eating it. Insects don't have a very advanced nervous system. As it stands, they can't even feel pain, let alone have complex emotions and thoughts.


Nope, I thought they would, but they didn't and it's still in one piece. Not even a nibble, but believe whatever you want.
_________________
My Minion Army!
<---Click?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Rockarmy4866



Joined: 09 Aug 2007
Posts: 364
Location: Mass US

PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2010 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

African Elephants actually mourn their dead too. when one dies there will be multiple elephants that will actually walk over to the dead one and just stand there watching it as if greiving
_________________
Danger Aaron
[The First Sheriff]

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Web Earth Online Forum Index -> Critter Cam and Animal News All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

This system provided by Web Earth Online © 2007 TSD Inc.